Tag Archives: Information Literacy

Writing Rights

Writing Rights

Shared by Gael Grossman

Adapted  from Burkhardt, J.M., MacDonald, Mary C. (2010). Teaching information literacy: 50 standard-based exercises for college students. Chicago: ALA

This is an assignment I use to get my students thinking about plagiarism and other issues of academic honesty. It’s more a discussion based assignment; however, I have had students write their response to it as well.

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Campus Resources Paper

 Campus Resources Paper

Shared by Beth Gulley

This assignment was designed to subtly promote student engagement on campus and increase student awareness of campus resources in addition to teaching MLA documentation and writing from sources.

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Six-credit Reading and Writing Course

Syllabus

Unit Project One — Education Autobiography

Unit Project Two — Placeography

Unit Project Three — Education Narrative

Unit Project Four — Argument

Unit Project 5 — I-Search

Shared by Jeremy Branstad

I follow a pretty traditional assignment sequence by transitioning from experience-based writing to source-based writing as the semester progresses. Students really seem to enjoy the placeography (unit 2), literacy narrative (unit 3) and i-search paper (unit 5) assignments. I’ll probably cut the fourth unit to make time for other things, maybe an audio essay, if I run the course again. I’m told that my assignments can look like a bit of a bear, at least in comparison to what students in my course levels at community colleges are sometimes assigned. I’m a pretty friendly person and I run safe, relaxed, and portfolio-based courses were students are encouraged to take risks, make mistakes, and grow.

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Wikipedia Assignment

Wikipedia assignment

Shared by Sarah Alexander Tsai

This group project, which can easily be scaled up or down, invites students to trace the way Wikipedia authors use and cite secondary sources.  In following Wikipedia‘s “research paths,” students are likely to recognize both the strengths and limitations of collaboratively edited resources.

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Name Game

The Name Game

Wach’s “What’s in a Name?

Shared by Sarah Alexander Tsai

By investigating the origins and meanings of their own names, students learn how to blend primary research (especially personal interviews) with focused personal narrative.  Since this fairly low-stakes assignment also functions nicely as a community builder, I like to assign it early on.  Recommended accompanying readings for this assignment are as follows:

  • Bonnie Wach’s “What’s in a Name?”
  • Tom Rosenberg’s “Changing My Name after Sixty Years”
  • Sandra Cisneros’ “My Name”

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Using Primary Sources

Using Primary Sources

Using Primary Sources (Article)

Shared by Liz Rohan

This is an activity, with an accompanying article, that helps students learn how to cite primary sources.

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