Tag Archives: Revision

Rethinking the Introduction

Rethinking the Introduction

Shared by Sarah Alexander Tsai

This activity, which works as an in-class writing challenge or as a regular assignment, aims to help students distinguish between genuine revision and light word-shuffling. In many cases, it’s also an exercise in using instructor feedback to revise.

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One-paragraph revision

One-paragraph revision

Shared by Elizabeth Baldridge

This activity is a follow-up to paper feedback, designed to ensure students understand instructor commentary and to encourage further revision.

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This I Believe Assignment Sequence

TIB Assignment Sequence

Rubric for TIB 3a 

Rubric for TIB 3b

Rubric for TIB 3c 

Shared by Karen Henderson

This assignment sequence we work on for about a month at the end of the semester. I use the This I Believe essays as models and ask students to write their own. I subsequently publish a hardbound book of student essays each year, which is my way of making the audience more authentic. Not every student chooses to be published, and it’s just an option not mandatory. The revision process comes from forcing them to think of the “one paper” as three separate papers, starting small, expanding, and then editing back. It does take quite a long time, but it allows me to model and scaffold learning, and the students do a lot of group work, so they see how their classmates’ papers come alive and become really nice writing. It’s a great way to end the semester, and I hope it changes their attitudes toward revision and group work.

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Introduction on Blackboard

Introduction on Bb

Shared by Nicole Hancock

This activity helps students rethink their introduction for a paper. This was inspired by an activity in Bruce Ballenger’s The Curious Researcher. Students must write more than one introduction for a paper that has already been drafted. They then post it in Blackboard and other students rate them using the star rating system. The assignment sheet I have submitted is what I give to students to explain the steps they should take. Screenshots have been inserted.

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Editing vs. Revising

Shared by Isabel Quintana Wulf

I made a couple of videos to show my students the difference between editing (cosmetic changes) and revising (structural changes)—I used Jing, a TechSmith software you can download for free. In the first video (http://www.screencast.com/t/3KDBv1wXFdu) , I show an example of editing using a sample student introduction for an essay and Track Changes in Word. I edit the writing (somewhat) and make the sentences more functional—of course, the intro still does not work. In the second video (http://www.screencast.com/t/uhkpj1d1), I talk the students through what revision actually would look like for that intro (moving parts around, eliminating parts, adding more context…). Maybe you can use this to demonstrate the difference between editing and revising in class?

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Revision Flowchart

Revision flowchart F11 color (1)

Revision flowchart F11 black and white

Shared by Isabel Quintana Wulf

I created this revision flowchart to help my students revise their essays. It can be used in different ways: students can start at the beginning and follow the chart step-by-step or they can start at any “Examine…” bubble. It asks them to consider different parts of the essay and what they need to double check in them. I made a color copy .pdf to post on the course site and a black and white .pdf to print and copy for the students.

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Highlighting to Make Visual Sense: Paragraph Practice

Highlighting Body Paragraphs

Shared by Isabel Quintana Wulf

With inspiration from/credit to Melissa Lucken, Lansing Community College, MI

The goal of this activity is to devise strategies a student can use to determine whether body paragraphs have all the parts they need to have: topic sentence, evidence/ examples, analysis, and transitions. I provide six examples of body ¶s from former students (or from current student essays chosen randomly depending on what time of the semester you chose to do this activity in class): I give them the overall thesis statement for the essay and one random body ¶. I ask them to highlight the topic sentence with one color, the evidence/ examples with another color, and the analysis with yet another color. I also ask them to circle the transitions they find in the ¶. Once you have given students some time to go over one ¶ (maybe 5 to 7 minutes?) and highlight its parts, do the exercise together using a projector or using the computer in the classroom if that is available to you. Discuss any discrepancies between different interpretations students might have and use the opportunity to show what constitutes evidence and what constitutes analysis. Repeat two or three times more as a class before asking them to highlight their own body ¶s or those of their peers. I use this strategy periodically in class and the visual effect seems to help students understand what is missing from the ¶s (usually a huge color gap for whatever the color of analysis was!). Repeat the activity every once in a while in class as a group to cement their understanding of what they are doing.

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